PLAN OF THE CITY by Joshua Frankel

according to this article, there will be an opera pitting Jane Jacobs vs. Robert Moses based on this video. The opera’s website is here. 

I’m waiting with bated breath. The Power Broker is still one of the best books I’ve ever read.

pureedepapa asked:

Do you like the city where you live (I mean from the point of view of an urbanist)?

There is a lot I like about my current city, and there are a few things I wish were different. Unfortunately, all American cities have been effected by our reliance on the automobile, and that has had drastic effects on how we build and how we interact with one another. 

We can only work towards the life we want (or we could move to Copenhagen).

transatlanticurbanism
transatlanticurbanism:

the-unreal-city:

London’s SkyCycle plan — should it ever be allowed, funded and built, would consist of 136 miles of elevated cycle routes through London. 

Mind blown. Probably the most imaginative, awesome conceptual cycling infrastructure I’ve ever seen.
Like most overly imaginative plans though I have a hunch this plan might not come to fruition…

I think this is a terrible idea, and I am an avid cyclist. 1. We have already learned elevated highways and rail are bad because of the shadows they cast2. On and off ramps take a lot of land3. Has this person ever biked before? Do you know how impossible that incline would be for average cyclists, let alone new cyclists it is trying to attract?4. William H. Whyte (and many other urbanists) in all of his writing has noted how separating traffic (bikes, cars, and pedestrians) leads to dead space that no one enjoys. And this has been proven in American cities that have made pedestrian walkways and pedestrian streets, and are now turning them back. Those are the 4 top reasons in my mind, but there are undoubtedly more. Such a project would be prohibitively expensive, and such money could be much better spent on projects like what New York and Portland are doing. Bah humbug.

transatlanticurbanism:

the-unreal-city:

London’s SkyCycle plan — should it ever be allowed, funded and built, would consist of 136 miles of elevated cycle routes through London. 

Mind blown. Probably the most imaginative, awesome conceptual cycling infrastructure I’ve ever seen.

Like most overly imaginative plans though I have a hunch this plan might not come to fruition…

I think this is a terrible idea, and I am an avid cyclist.

1. We have already learned elevated highways and rail are bad because of the shadows they cast

2. On and off ramps take a lot of land

3. Has this person ever biked before? Do you know how impossible that incline would be for average cyclists, let alone new cyclists it is trying to attract?

4. William H. Whyte (and many other urbanists) in all of his writing has noted how separating traffic (bikes, cars, and pedestrians) leads to dead space that no one enjoys. And this has been proven in American cities that have made pedestrian walkways and pedestrian streets, and are now turning them back.

Those are the 4 top reasons in my mind, but there are undoubtedly more. Such a project would be prohibitively expensive, and such money could be much better spent on projects like what New York and Portland are doing.

Bah humbug.

I just got back from my visiting my first love, my hometown of Buffalo. We had a great time staying in the city, drinking and dancing into the wee hours, and enjoying the diversity of the city. And while I love the city to its core, I know many will remind me not to forget the deeply ingrained problems the city faces. Which is of course why our city’s unofficial motto is, “Buffalo: The City of No Illusions.”

The first time I ever saw that written down, was on a t-shirt by Michael Morgulis, who is a great Buffalo screen printer and iconographer. 

All of these memories led me to see how else people have used this motto, and I stumbled upon the embedded short documentary about the city, as well as an upcoming anthology of noir based in Buffalo by authors connected to the city, including Joyce Carol Oates. It’s called Buffalo Noir, and will be available 11/23/13.

I love my city, and I have no illusions attached to it.

[This short documentary was produced in 2011 by Vanessa Carr at UC Berkeley’s Graduate School of Journalism, and is distributed by the I Files.]

eyeseedepths
eyeseedepths:

Day 2: Abundance.
Lately I have seen an abundance of large Televisions lying facedown on median strips - and imagine the abundance of new flat screen TVs which are rapidly populating so many houses now. Pondering the level of abundance which we have here that causes such turnover of resources that even a 5-6 year old TV is obsolete, and carelessly discarded.
“Nothing is enough for the man to whom enough is too little.”  Epicurus

eyeseedepths:

Day 2: Abundance.

Lately I have seen an abundance of large Televisions lying facedown on median strips - and imagine the abundance of new flat screen TVs which are rapidly populating so many houses now. Pondering the level of abundance which we have here that causes such turnover of resources that even a 5-6 year old TV is obsolete, and carelessly discarded.

“Nothing is enough for the man to whom enough is too little.”  Epicurus

ideaswerelikekittens
Let it be granted then that as a rule, workman and employer should make free agreements and in particular should freely agree as to wages; nevertheless, there is a dictate of nature more imperious and more ancient than any bargain between man and man, that the remuneration must be enough to support the wage earner in reasonable and frugal comfort. If through necessity or the fear of a worse evil the workman accepts harder conditions because an employer or contractor will give him no better, he is the victim of force and injustice.