So, Son, instead of crying, be strong, so as to be able to comfort your mother … take her for a long walk in the quiet country, gathering wild flowers here and there… . But remember always, Dante, in the play of happiness, don’t you use all for yourself only… . help the persecuted and the victim because they are your better friends… . In this struggle of life you will find more and love and you will be loved.

Nicola Sacco’s (of Sacco & Vanzetti) message to his son, after being sentenced to death for alleged armed robbery.  Was more likely framed because he was an anarchist and foreign. (1927)

A People’s History of the United States: 1492 to Present 

by Howard Zinn

It’s amazing how things come back around. I’m also reading old essays by noted urbanist Lewis Mumford, and he complains about food, coffee, and culture as if he was part of the vanguard of hipsters in early 2000’s Williamsburg. He says:
"Every grocer’s boasted a row of black lacquered bins holding tea and coffee in bulk,  which were identified by their place of origin. One bought coffees––Santos, Rio, Maracaibo, Java, Mocha—knowing their special flavors and gauging the quality against a wide range of prices… Nothing so well indicates to me the difference between my own generation and the present one as the fact that I do not, without a certain inner resistance and resentment, accept a system of marketing in which all the decisions have been taken out of the hands of both the shopkeeper and the customer and put under the remote control of the market researcher and the packaging expert, the advertising agency and the wholesale distributor. Those who have grown up in this packaged world accept such external controls and compulsions as normal: their loss of choice, their loss of fast, they do not even notice, for they have never known anything different. We have now exchanged autonomy for automation." ("A Child of the City," from Sketches from Life by Lewis Mumford. © 1982)
And yet in spite of that, I spent this morning in Downtown Durham, NC sipping an excellent single origin coffee from a brand new coffee shop, Cocoa Cinnamon, and paying a premium to do it. The shop was packed, and the couple who opened the shop began as a roving tricycle, and eventually used Kickstarter to raise the funds for a brick and mortar shop.
The slow food movement, the local food movement, the revitalization of a number of urban areas have been slowly building for decades. I am optimistic that these forces will continue to mount in cities of all sizes, and we will continue to increase the number of choices we have. I hope that the stories of our parents, grandparents, and great-grandparents will inspire us to become more connected again, and search out unique joys, to build our local communities, and create more sustainable economic models.
This is asking a lot, but I get hopeful while drinking single origin Costa Rican coffee.

It’s amazing how things come back around. I’m also reading old essays by noted urbanist Lewis Mumford, and he complains about food, coffee, and culture as if he was part of the vanguard of hipsters in early 2000’s Williamsburg. He says:

"Every grocer’s boasted a row of black lacquered bins holding tea and coffee in bulk,  which were identified by their place of origin. One bought coffees––Santos, Rio, Maracaibo, Java, Mocha—knowing their special flavors and gauging the quality against a wide range of prices… Nothing so well indicates to me the difference between my own generation and the present one as the fact that I do not, without a certain inner resistance and resentment, accept a system of marketing in which all the decisions have been taken out of the hands of both the shopkeeper and the customer and put under the remote control of the market researcher and the packaging expert, the advertising agency and the wholesale distributor. Those who have grown up in this packaged world accept such external controls and compulsions as normal: their loss of choice, their loss of fast, they do not even notice, for they have never known anything different. We have now exchanged autonomy for automation." ("A Child of the City," from Sketches from Life by Lewis Mumford. © 1982)

And yet in spite of that, I spent this morning in Downtown Durham, NC sipping an excellent single origin coffee from a brand new coffee shop, Cocoa Cinnamon, and paying a premium to do it. The shop was packed, and the couple who opened the shop began as a roving tricycle, and eventually used Kickstarter to raise the funds for a brick and mortar shop.

The slow food movement, the local food movement, the revitalization of a number of urban areas have been slowly building for decades. I am optimistic that these forces will continue to mount in cities of all sizes, and we will continue to increase the number of choices we have. I hope that the stories of our parents, grandparents, and great-grandparents will inspire us to become more connected again, and search out unique joys, to build our local communities, and create more sustainable economic models.

This is asking a lot, but I get hopeful while drinking single origin Costa Rican coffee.

William H. Whyte: The Social Life of Small Urban Spaces - The Street Corner 

I recently visited family and friends in Philadelphia and had many great conversations about urban spaces. William Whyte of course was brought up, and it made me search out this video. Lucky for me, someone uploaded it to Vimeo with a CC license. Please watch and enjoy, William Whyte is the reason the Carrie Bradshaw, et al, ate lunch in Bryant Park. Watch the video and find out why.

cartophile
So Tumblr is awesome to share things, but it sucks when someone doesn’t bother to reblog and steals something from you. This is my tattoo and I posted it on Tumblr and no one reblogged it from me. 
Don’t steal bro.
http://theurbanist.tumblr.com/image/237495048

cartophile:

I want to know: 1) what city this is; 2) if his shirt says “PLANNING”; 3) if he’s going to amend the tattoo when they tear up city streets for an interstate.

(via kimberlybozeman-deactivated2012)

So Tumblr is awesome to share things, but it sucks when someone doesn’t bother to reblog and steals something from you. This is my tattoo and I posted it on Tumblr and no one reblogged it from me. 

Don’t steal bro.

http://theurbanist.tumblr.com/image/237495048

cartophile:

I want to know: 1) what city this is; 2) if his shirt says “PLANNING”; 3) if he’s going to amend the tattoo when they tear up city streets for an interstate.

(via kimberlybozeman-deactivated2012)

I’ve only owned a car for two years of my life, and that was about 7 years ago. I have no interest in owning a car again, but this is a great ad, and I’m glad to see Chrysler taking some pride in the Motor City. 

The “ruins porn” of old cities like Detroit was important for a time to help remind people of the history that was being lost in cities like Detroit and Buffalo, but now it’s time to start showcasing how these cities have been rebuilding over the past ten years. (Initial numbers from the American Communities Survey from 2005-2009 conducted by the Census shows that many districts in cities have been improving since the year 2000.)

People are moving back to these cities and reclaiming parts of our American cultural heritage, it isn’t everyone, but it is significant and it is making a difference.